By definition, a press release is a written communication, giving details about an event, circumstance or other happening, usually on behalf of an organisation or entity.

One of the most important things to do when preparing your release, is proper research. Research the particular release online to have a picture of the appropriate tone, language, structure, and format.

Make deliberate effort to avoid jargons or technical vocabulary and if they must be included then, define them.

Draft the release to suit a particular media outfit and to specific reporter in charge of the beat the press release covers.

The timeline of release is key as it must show the news content is current and not an old information.

In writing a detailed release, it is important there is a call-back to the source for either an update or excluded information.

Endeavour to include the company name, title, and subhead, if any. The first paragraph should contain these editorial items to serve as visibility through search engines, other professionals and readers.

Press release meant for news media should be printed on the company’s letterhead.

Do not forget to include a “call to action” in the release. It enables you tell the audience what exactly you intend they do after digesting the information. Of course, it should also include the contact- phone number, website address, email, etc. of the executive who authored the release for clarification and other exigencies.

It is advisable the release is fully written before putting the headline. The headline, of course, must be catchy enough, concise and factual. Copy editors would determine the real headline they choose to give to the publication edition that will finally get on the pages of their magazines and newspapers.

Let the headline of the press release describe the email you will send to editors. Deliberate attempt is also needed to write an attention-getting release.

Sending release through email demands that you become careful that formatting is not used too often. The use of multiple colours, too, should be discouraged, as it puts off possible recipients of the email.

Try not to send the release as an attachment. If the occasion demands you use anattachment then, use plain text or Rich Text Format file. Some recipients prefer Word documents, in its various new versions, (.docx) or (.doc). PDF could be employed if a whole media kit bearing a number of graphical contents is to be sent.

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