The art of writing is different for everyone; writing comes easily to some people, and as a result, they are eager to share their work with others. For other people, writing could be a burden. The combination of words to form sentences that can entertain, educate and inspire could jar the senses of this set of people. This makes them hesitant to share their work with the public, especially with editors, because of the vulnerability involved in having someone spot their mistakes and bring their imperfections to their attention. Despite the vulnerability involved, it does not take away the grave importance of an editor to the writing process.

Thus, here are 5 things you might want to keep in mind when hiring or working with an editor, in order to feel less vulnerable.

  • Share Your Goal with the Editor

When you hire an editor, share your editing goal with him or her. Do you want the editor to help you become a better writer or do you want him to help you edit your work to be ready for publishing? When you share your goal, the editor would know exactly what to look for and would be guided by the kind of feedback to offer.

  • An Editor Would Be More Invested in the Areas He Loves

It is important you take note of this when hiring an editor for your writings. An editor would be more willing to invest time, energy and skills in an area he/she is most interested in. So, before you hire an editor, make sure the candidate’s area of interest and expertise match your own writing aspirations.

  • Don’t Give Your First Draft to an Editor

There are times you need to write and send it to an editor for review and for immediate publishing, but there are other times that immediate publishing is not necessary. So, if you know that publishing your work is not a matter of urgency, after you write your first draft, leave it for some time, like 2 or 3 weeks, then do a personal review again, before you send it to an editor for a final review. This would help you spot mistakes that you might have omitted when you wrote the first draft and would help your work come-out finer.

  • Not Every Editor Will Agree with Your Perspective

When you write, not everyone will agree with your perspectives; and your editor would be no different. So, when your editor does not agree with what you have written, do not give in to despair.

  • Great Editing Doesn’t Equal to a Great Book

Just because you have given your work to an editor for review doesn’t necessarily mean you have written a great book, or that the world will love it. Despite the editing, there will be people who will dislike what you have written. So, don’t be disappointed in yourself, or in the editor. Above all, be your own editor first; learn some editing skills and look at your work critically before you send it to an editor for a final review

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